Call for Papers for a Special Issue of The International Journal of Press/Politics: “Visual Politics”

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Call for Papers for a Special Issue of The International Journal of Press/Politics

“Visual Politics”

Guest editors: Erik Bucy (erik.bucy@ttu.edu), Texas Tech University
Jungseock Joo (jjoo@comm.ucla.edu), University of California at Los Angeles

Manuscript submission deadline: 15 December 2019

Images are both ubiquitous and consequential in contemporary politics. The rise of images in politics parallels the rise of images in society as icons of socio-political messaging, vessels of persuasive intent, and efficient carriers of social information for citizens of increasingly harried societies. From television coverage of campaigns and elections to visual memes and images of leaders circulated on social media, visual portrayals shape perceptions of the political world. When used strategically, visual portrayals hold the capacity to frame issues, candidates, and causes in a particular light and affect the acceptance or rejection of social policies. As representations of public opinion and leadership, political images influence issue understanding and motivate citizens to action.

Political visuals are potent in part because they do not require conventional literacy to apprehend and operate at both an individual and cultural level. From an information processing perspective, political images are highly efficient carriers of social and symbolic information that is quickly assessed, rapidly judged, and readily remembered. In news coverage, candidate portrayals and event depictions may crystallize sentiment among the viewing public and alternately inspire increased involvement or disenchantment with politics. Culturally, images can act as icons of social solidarity or political isolation, serving to mainstream or marginalize individuals, groups, and causes. The polysemic quality of images opens them to diverse interpretation, depending on the viewer’s orientation.

As forms of information, political images are not only open to interpretation but are also susceptible to digital manipulation. Image shading, facial blending, digital editing, and other alterations of political materials can have persuasive effects on audiences, raising troubling ethical concerns. More recently, the mass spread of “deepfakes”, i.e., manipulated video recordings, threatens to undermine the authenticity of recorded candidate communication and further confuse unsuspecting viewers, already buffeted by fabricated visual memes and text-based disinformation campaigns.

These and related considerations make the systematic study of political visuals and their effects necessary and urgent. Despite renewed interest in visual analysis within political communication, images remain an understudied feature of the contemporary political media landscape. This special issue of The International Journal of Press/Politics therefore invites original research conducted in any methodological tradition that fits the theme of “Visual Politics.” In this special issue, we hope to highlight new possibilities for theory development, methodological innovation, and cross-national approaches to advance the study of visual political communication.

RESEARCH TOPICS

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The influence of political images in digital campaigns, including comparisons between online messaging, social media strategies, and more traditional forms of political advertising
  • The role of visual messaging in disinformation efforts, whether used to confuse, incite resentment, or demotivate potential voter or citizen involvement
  • Computational analysis of large-scale visual datasets to detect patterns of coverage or behavior not evident in smaller, hand-coded projects
  • Integrated or comparative analysis of multimodal cues in political messages and their synergistic or differential impacts on viewer perceptions
  • Visual analysis of protest and collection action, including visual framing of activism or demonstrations as well as visual memes circulated on social media
  • Cross-national comparisons of visual news framing of politics or protest and its reception by audiences
  • Viewer reception of newer visual technologies such as 360-degree video cameras to depict campaign events, demonstrations, marches, or other collective actions
  • Visual depictions of populist and fringe political actors, including signature gestures and nonverbal displays, expressive range, or performative repertoires
  • Effects of nonverbal aggression, norm violations, and other transgressive candidate behavior on viewers of political programming
  • Visual measures of negative advertising, incivility, “in your face”-style of candidate interaction, or other normatively fraught political communication styles
  • Visual analysis of hate speech and white nationalism, including identifiable signs and symbols as identified by the Anti-Defamation League and other watchdogs
  • The role of viewer orientations (e.g., ideology, partisanship, political interest, age cohort, moral outlook, geographical situatedness, issue attitudes) in shaping political image interpretations and message efficacy
  • The role of visual content in explaining patterns of news sharing on social media
  • The use of visuals in emerging genres of political campaign communication, whether mini-documentaries, mash-up advertising, candidate-generated videos, or political selfies.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION

Manuscript submissions for this special issue are due on 15 December 2019.
Please submit your work through our online submission portal and ensure that the first line of the cover letter states: “Manuscript to be considered for the special issue on Visual Politics”. Manuscripts should follow the IJPP submission guidelines. Submissions will be subject to a double-blind peer review process and must not have been published, accepted for publication, or under consideration for publication elsewhere.

Authors interested in submitting their work are encouraged to contact the guest editors, Erik Bucy (erik.bucy@ttu.edu) and Jungseock Joo (jjoo@comm.ucla.edu) with questions.

EXPECTED TIMELINE

  • Paper submissions: 15 December 2019
  • First decision: 15 February 2020
  • Paper revisions: 15 April 2020
  • Final decision: 15 May 2020
  • Online publication: July 2020
  • Print publication: October 2020

New Editorial Team at the International Journal of Press/Politics

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In January 2019, I will officially start my new job as Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics.

When I was appointed Editor-in-Chief of IJPP, I returned to the “big tent” approach that inspired its founding editors, Marvin Kalb and Pippa Norris, and reformed the governance of the journal to ensure it can continue growing and thriving.

I am honored that three outstanding scholars will serve as Associate Editors: C.W. Anderson (University of Leeds), Sandra González-Bailón (University of Pennsylvania), and Sophie Lecheler (University of Vienna).

I also found in Yannis Theocharis (University of Bremen) an excellent successor as Book Reviews Editor and in David Smith (Loughborough University) a dedicated Managing Editor.

I also reappointed two-thirds of the journal’s Editorial Board and invited a new cohort of colleagues to join them. I am grateful for their service and delighted that women and men are now equally represented in the Board.

The new editorial team will serve for the same duration as my first term as Editor-in-Chief (2019-2021). I cannot wait to start working with them.

I was pleased to introduce the new team at the fourth annual IJPP conference in Oxford.

 

Program of the Fourth annual International Journal of Press/Politics conference

ijpp[Cross-posted and adapted from Rasmus Kleis Nielsen’s website.]

I am delighted to announce the program of the fourth annual conference of the International Journal of Press/Politics. This is going to be a particularly special one for me as I am taking over as Editor-in-Chief of the journal in January 2019. The outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, and I are organizing the conference, to be held at the University of Oxford on 11-12 October 2018. I am particularly pleased that my friend and colleague at Loughborough University Andrew Chadwick will be the conference keynote speaker. I will also have the pleasure to chair the final roundtable with members of the journal’s Editorial Board.

The conference venue is Green Templeton College, 43 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG). Below is the program.

Thursday October 11th

8.45-9.00 Opening remarks

9.00-10.00 Keynote lecture, Andy Chadwick

10.30-12.00 Panels 1a and 1b

PANEL 1a: SOCIAL MEDIA & ELECTIONS (Chair: Gunn Enli)
Facebook Advertising in the United Kingdom General Election of 2017
Nick Anstead, Richard Stupart, Damian Tambini and Joao Vieira-Magalhaes

Diverging patterns of Facebook interactions on online news: media sources and partisan communities in the lead-up of 2018 Italian General Election
Fabio Giglietto, Augusto Valeriani, Nicola Righetti, and Giada Marino

When does Abuse and Harassment Marginalize Female Political Voices on Social Media?
Yannis Theocharis, Maarja Luhiste, Zoltan Fazekas, Sebastian Adrian Popa, and Pablo Barberá

PANEL 1b: NEWS CONSUMPTION (Chair: Homero Gil de Zúñiga)

More News Avoiders? A Longitudinal Study of News Consumption in Low and High Choice Media Environments 1997-2016
Rune Karlsen, Audun Beyer, and Kari Steen-Johnsen

News consumption on social media in authoritarian regimes: polarization and political apathy
Aleksandra Urman

Gateways to news and selective exposure: Evidence from survey and navigation data
Ana Cardenal, Carlos Aguilar-Paredes, and Mario Pérez-Montoro

13.00-14.30 Panels 2a and 2b

PANEL 2a: CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATION (Chair: Ralph Schroeder)

The Moderating Effect of Political Responsibility on Populist Communication Online: The case of the German AfD
Tobias Widmann

“His Tweets Speak for Themselves”: An Analysis of Donald Trump’s Twitter Behaviour
Suzanne Elayan, Martin Sykora and Tom Jackson

The rally-intensive campaign: A distinct type of election campaign in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond
Dan Paget

PANEL 2b: JOURNALISM IN DANGEROUS PLACES (Chair: Jane Suiter)

“Beyond the Dark Mountains”: Suspicion and Distrust in the work of journalists covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Tali Aharoni

Strategies for safety autonomy: The role of journalists’ capital enhancing professional autonomy in violent contexts
Julieta Brambila

Local authoritarian enclaves in democracies and democratic hybrids: How much do they explain the harassment and murder of journalists over the last quarter century?
Sallie Hughes and Yulia Vorobyeva

15.00-16.30 Panels 3a and 3b

PANEL 3a: JOURNALISM IN PRACTICE (Chair: Ana Langer)

Democratizing Views in International News: Proportions of Northern and Southern Perspectives in American and Finnish Coverage of the Global South
Kirsi Cheas

The political determinants of journalists’ career
Andrea Ceron, Sergio Splendore,Rosa Berganza, Thomas Hanitzsch, and Neil Thurman

How German and British journalists differ in their political and ethical role conceptions
Imke Henkel, Neil Thurman, Veronika Deffner, and Ivica Obadic

PANEL 3b: CONCEPTS AND THEORIES (Chair: Jay Bumler)

The Authentic Politician: Strategies to Construct Authenticity in Political Campaigns
Gunn Enli

Old and New Echo Chambers
Paolo Mancini and Anna Stanziano

Communicative Power in the Hybrid Media System
Andreas Jungherr, Oliver Posegga, and Jisun An

Friday October 12

9.00-10.30 Panels 4a and 4b

PANEL 4a: NEWS CONTENT (Chair: Neil Thurman)

From Network to Narrative: Understanding the Nature and Trajectory of News Stories
Sarah Oates

Thinking through the political media system: Surprising similarities between polarized media outlets during Election 2016
Chris Wells, Josephine Lukito, and Zhongkai Sun

An anatomy of the complex role of the media on policy ‘U-turns’
Ana Ines Langer

PANEL 4b: MISINFORMATION AND MANIPULATION (Chair: Erik Bucy)

The Populist Campaigns against European Public Service Media: Hot Air or Existential Threat?
Felix Simon, Annika Sehl and Ralph Schroeder

Fake News as a Combative Frame: Results from a qualitative content analysis of the term’s definitions and uses on Twitter
Dominique Doering and Gina Neff

Disinformation and Media Manipulation in the Swedish 2018 Election
Ralph Schroeder, Lisa Kaati, and Johan Fernquist10.45-11.45 Panels 5a and 5b

PANEL 5a: ONLINE NEWS AND MEDIA USE (Chair: Gina Neff)

Are there echo chambers? A 7-nation comparison
Grant Blank & Elizabeth Dubois

The Proliferation of the ‘News Finds Me’ Perception Across Different Societies
Homero Gil de Zúñiga Nadine Strauss Brigitte Huber James Liu

PANEL 5B: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON ATTITUDES TO NEWS (Chair: Ana Cardenal)

Perceived Media Bias and Political Action: A 17-Country Comparison
Matthew Barnidge, Hernando Rojas, Rüdiger Schmitt-Beck, Paul A. Beck

Polarization and Inequality: key drivers of distrust in media old and new?
Jane Suiter and Richard Fletcher

12.00-13.00 IJPP Editorial Board Roundtable (with Paolo Mancini, Sallie Hughes, and Sarah Oates) and closing remarks

13.00-14.00 Lunch

Call for Papers: Fourth IJPP conference, Oct 10-12 in Oxford (submit by June 15)

Cross-posted from Rasmus Kleis Nielsen’s website.

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October 10-12 2018, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford will host the fourth International Journal of Press/Politics conference, focused on academic research on the relation between media and political processes around the world. (See the program from the 2015 conference, the 2016 conference, and the 2017 conference.)

A selection of the best full papers presented at the conference will be published in the journal after peer review. The deadline for submission of abstracts is June 15 2018. Attendees will be notified of acceptance by June 29 2018.

Professor Andrew Chadwick from Loughborough University will deliver a keynote lecture.

The conference brings together scholars doing internationally-oriented or comparative research on the intersection between news media and politics around the world. It aims to provide a forum for academics from a wide range of different disciplines and countries to discuss the theoretical, methodological, and substantial challenges and opportunities for research in this area. It is open to work from political science, political communication, journalism studies, media and communications research, computational social science, and many other fields.

Examples of relevant topics include the political implications of current changes in the media, the relative importance of new forms of digital media for engaging with news and politics, studies of the role of entertainment and popular culture in how people follow current affairs, studies of relations between political actors and journalists, research on political communication beyond the electoral context (including of government, interest groups, and social movements), all with a particular interest in studies that focus on parts of the world that are under-researched in the international English language academic literature, develop comparative approaches, or represent substantial theoretical or methodological advances.

Titles and abstracts for papers (250 words max) are invited by June 15 2018. The abstract should clearly describe the key question, the theoretical and methodological approach, the evidence the argument is based on, as well as its wider implication of international relevance.

Please send submissions to the email address ijpp@politics.ox.ac.uk with the subject line “IJPP conference submission” including in the email the full title of your paper, the abstract, and your name and professional affiliation. (Please do not send attachments.) Full papers based on accepted abstracts will be due Friday September 14, 2018.

The conference is organized by Rasmus Kleis Nielsen (RISJ Director of Research and IJPP Editor-in-Chief) and Cristian Vaccari (Loughborough University, incoming Editor-in-Chief). Please contact Rasmus Kleis Nielsen with questions at rasmus.nielsen@politics.ox.ac.uk.

More about the journal, the Reuters Institute, and the keynote speaker:

The International Journal of Press/Politics

IJPP is an interdisciplinary journal for the analysis and discussion of the role of the press and politics in a globalized world. The journal publishes theoretical and empirical research which analyzes the linkages between the news media and political processes and actors around the world, emphasizes international and comparative work, and links research in the fields of political communication and journalism studies, and the disciplines of political science and media and communication.

Keynote Speaker – Andrew Chadwick

Andrew Chadwick (PhD London School of Economics, FRSA) is Professor of Political Communication at Loughborough University, where he leads the Doctoral Training Centre in Online Civic Culture and is a member of the Centre for Research in Communication and Culture. His books include The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013; Second Edition, 2017), which won the 2016 International Journal of Press/Politics Book Award for an outstanding book on media and politics published in the previous ten years and the American Political Science Association Information Technology and Politics Section Best Book Award, 2014; as well as The Handbook of Internet Politics, co-edited with Philip N. Howard (Routledge 2009), and Internet Politics: States, Citizens, and New Communication Technologies (Oxford University Press, 2006), which won the American Sociological Association Best Book Award (Communication and Information Technologies Section). Professor Chadwick is also the editor of the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and was a founding Associate Editor of the Journal of Information Technology and Politics and continues as a Senior Editorial Board member for the journal. He also serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Press/Politics and Social Media and Society.

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism marks the University of Oxford’s commitment to the comparative study of journalism around the world. Anchored in the recognition of the key role of independent media in open societies and the power of information in the modern world, the institute aims to serve as the leading forum for a productive engagement between scholars from a wide range of disciplines and practitioners of journalism. It brings the depth and rigor of academic scholarship of the highest standards to major issues of relevance to the world of news media. It is global in its perspective and in the content of its activities.

Appointed Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics

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I am delighted to announce that in January 2019 I will become the new Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics.

Since its foundation in 1996, The International Journal of Press/Politics has always published path-breaking research on the intersection between media and politics, based on a plurality of approaches, a variety of methods, and a distinctive international and comparative outlook.

I will have very big shoes to fill, following in the footsteps of founding editors Pippa Norris and Marvin Kalb, and subsequent editors Alex Jones and Thomas Patterson, Silvio Waisbord, and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen. Together with Sage Publications, they have built and strengthened a unique journal that I have always cherished as a reader, reviewer, author, and book reviews editor.

I still remember when as an undergraduate student at the University of Bologna I discovered IJPP in the library of the Department of Communications. I ended up spending the whole day frantically browsing all the print issues I could get my hands on, scribbling notes for pages and pages, and feeling my head spin at the thought of all the amazing research that was being done around the world and all the things I wanted to learn. I feel very fortunate that now I have a chance to help my colleagues inspire future generations of students and scholars through the journal.

Editing IJPP will be a fantastic opportunity to strengthen its distinctive profile, serve the outstanding research communities that contribute to it, and tackle urgent and crucial debates around media, politics and citizenship around the world. I cannot wait to get started.

Here is a link to Loughborough University’s press release on my appointment, with some nice quotes from outgoing Editor Rasmus Kleis Nielsen and Sage Publications. Many thanks to them, the members of the journal’s editorial board, and my colleagues in Loughborough for their support.